Advertisements

After spending much of 2013 watching oh, so many Agatha Christie adaptations, I decided to put together a list of all her novels and short story collections, and whether and when they have been adapted for film. I’ll attempt to keep this updated as new information comes to mind; it appears in 2018 we have entered another new era of adaptations for the Queen of Crime. See below:

(list updated – August 2018)

(more…)

Advertisements

Murder on the Orient Express is – not unfairly – one of Christie’s most revered and famed novels. The story of the murder in the Calais Coach, and Hercule Poirot solving the case amidst the twelve suspects in a snowbound train was the source for 1974’s opening edition in the Poirot film series, a lavish and self-consciously nostalgic all-star film, and, more recently, David Suchet’s bleaker version which emphasised the moral trials that both the killer(s) and Poirot must undergo. In between came this little oddity, a modern take on the story with a more subdued Poirot and a somewhat cherry-picking approach to the story itself. Let’s take a look…

(more…)

Welcome back, folks, as we review Peter Ustinov‘s final two performances as Hercule Poirot. After two big-budget, all-star, location-based extraordinaires, Ustinov had returned to play the character in two, much lesser TV films. But while only one of the four movies – Evil Under the Sun – was really good, Ustinov’s performance is unquestionably delightful, particularly as he was allowed free reign of the character on the small screen. Today, we’ll look at his last two outings: the first a TV movie, and the second his return to the silver screen.

(more…)

Well, great news, folks: although it remains in negotation, David Suchet seems ever more optimistic that the remaining Poirot novels will be filmed in 2012. It’s been a long road, as period films don’t come cheap, particularly not when commanding the kind of cast and attention to detail expected. (Suchet is, wonderfully, a purist, who obsesses over the little things – perfectly cast, I’d say!) With the rise and fall of period drama being a regular fixture since television began, it was no surprise that Poirot would face uphill battles and, since the series debuted in 1989, it’s certainly had to fight to stay on the air. Thankfully, it looks like there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.

[THIS JUST IN: Thanks to the wonderful commenter below, who alerted me to the recent news that Suchet WILL get his wish: five final Poirot films will be made in 2012 and 2013.]

So, I thought I’d muse on what we can expect should Suchet get his wish:

(more…)

And so, more than twenty years after he began in the role, David Suchet returns for four more Poirot films: Three Act Tragedy, The Clocks, Hallowe’en Party and Murder on the Orient Express. Below, I’ll look at each of them in detail, as well as considering the dramatic evolution of the series. Tomorrow, I’ll mull through some hopes and prayers for the program’s final series, which is currently in the midst of negotiation. (Update: as of January 2012, the series has been renewed.)

(For previous posts, see: series 1 – 6, series 7 – 8, series 9, series 10 – 11).

(more…)

2. Five Little Pigs  (1942)

Hercule Poirot #23

Poirot reads five different accounts of the same long-forgotten murder, uncovering an intricate crime, and the devastating effect it had on the lives of those involved.

It’s hard work discerning between entrants at the very top of my Christie rankings. Every novel in the Top Ten could conceivably be someone’s favourite. But Five Little Pigs is – for my money – Hercule Poirot’s best outing, and Christie’s most mature novel. (Yes, I know it’s only number two, but we’ll get to that…)

(more…)

After two big-budget, all-star Poirot films, Peter Ustinov‘s series took an unexpected turn into that dreaded genre: the TV movie. And, as if that wasn’t enough, it also helpfully shifts the entire tone and chronology of the films, for good measure! Today, I’ll be looking at the next two films in Ustinov’s Poirot sextet:

(more…)